What’s on YOUR bedside table?

The New York Times Book Review routinely asks the question above in its author interviews. Often, the books mentioned make me feel illiterate or at least lacking in erudition. I cheated a little on my own list below since one of the books I’m about to mention was actually on my chest of drawers. I relocated it to my bedside.

 

Here is a picture of the books that were next to my bed on Saturday, April 5.

IMG_0627

 

And here is each book with a short comment.

IMG_0630

I’d totally forgotten I’d asked for a copy of fairy tales for Christmas–in 2010 maybe! My idea was to read one per night so I could incorporate them into my work. I might have looked at one entry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_0628

I asked for FAR FROM THE TREE for Christmas 2012. I read half of it and found it very interesting, but I had hopes of finding others who would like to read and discuss it.

 

IMG_0633

This book was probably my newest acquisition. I’d read SENSE OF AN ENDING and loved it, but I found this one difficult to get into. Too fragmented, and then when I was reading it at night, the fragments were fragmented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have the bad habit of buying interesting sounding books at conferences and then never reading them

IMG_0636

I loaned this to my friend N. so she could read the section on The Mommy Brain while I read about rearing babies the French way (see previous post). Although THE FEMALE BRAIN is interesting, it is more like a textbook that BEBE and I elected to finish BEBE before soldiering on in this one. I’m close to done.

IMG_0631

RISING FIRE was loaned to me by a writing friend. I read the beginning and it is next on my reading list. It is written by a Colorado State University professor whom I once met at a picnic. I think he’s a friend of friends, too. Narrative/creative nonfiction isn’t my go-to style of writing, but after enjoying writing my blogging, I’m rethinking this as a possible creative outlet.

 

IMG_0639

I started this novel, which I bought at an estate sale. I’ve seen Mystic River, of course, and enjoyed it, but I’d never read the author. The price was right so I picked this copy up this summer. Somewhere along the line. I started reading it, and even though I’m not a baseball fan, I enjoyed what I read. I put it aside to read THE FEMALE BRAIN. I may go back to it and read it concurrently with the nonfiction above.

IMG_0632

My last “book” on the nightstand is a dream diary. I’ve read up on dreams and kept track of dreams at various times in the course of my life. It’s waiting for me to remember a dream and write it down.

The last item on my nightstand is the cause of me being behind on my reading.

IMG_0637

My goal every week is to finish the Sunday Times by Saturday so that I can start fresh the next morning.  Sometimes when we’re away for the weekend, I ask my neighbor to please, keep the paper, so I can get a head start on other reading, but she usually gives it back to me anyway. I’ve read the Sunday Times since I was a teenager.

Probably I should say I read parts of the Times. We subscribed for the Book Review. If I read the whole paper all the way through, I’d be like my college friend June who saves the paper to read later but never gets around to it.

IMG_0026

June last summer in NYC.

I’d probably read more books if I restricted myself to reading a few articles on line or had the Denver Post delivered instead of the Times. My latest excuse? You never know where an idea for a blog post might come from. I have a draft for a post generated from a story in last week’s edition and while glancing through today’s Styles section a feature caught my eye. I may want to address that issue here as well.

What books are next to your bed or wherever you tend to read?

 

, , , , , , , , , ,

  1. #1 by bkwins on April 7, 2014 - 7:04 pm

    The Given Day isn’t really about baseball, although the opening makes it seem that way. Babe Ruth is only an occasional character. It’s more about labor movements and race relations in early 20th century, just after WWI. I’ve almost finished it.

    Next on my reading list are Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore and The Great Flood Gates of the Wonder World.

  2. #2 by cryptictown on April 7, 2014 - 7:04 pm

    I don’t have any books next to my bed. But my to-read shelf if out of control.

  3. #3 by Vinny Grette on April 12, 2014 - 7:25 am

    Have you read The Night Circus? From your book list, I think you might like it as much as I did 🙂 . I’m featuring it in two posts starting a week from this Tuesday if you’re interested. Fun!

    • #4 by c2london on April 13, 2014 - 5:26 pm

      It has been recommended to me more than once and I almost bought it at the airport last time I flew. Your series sounds interesting!

  4. #5 by Vinny Grette on April 13, 2014 - 7:05 pm

    I like to use stories as a bridge to healthy eating and Night Circus was pretty ideal 🙂 – lots there to muse over, too.

I'd love to hear what you have to say!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Tahoma Literary Review

A Northwest Based Literary Journal

Write with Personality

Andrea J. Wenger: Creative, Technical, and Freelance Writing and Editing

Memorable Fancies

a daily microfiction from Terence Kuch

The Weird World of B. K. Winstead

Living at the Intersection of Music and Technology, Language and Creative Writing

Caroline Marwitz, Writer

Just another WordPress.com site

Cryptic Town

Dedicated to Paranormal Fiction

reuniontroubles

Just another WordPress.com site

%d bloggers like this: